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Laravel queue worker timeout

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Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I have problem with laravel long running process which is added to queue. Using database driver and supervisord. The problem is that after worker 1 picking this job it must do some heavy processing from 5 to 20min long and by that time worker 2 picking this job too!

How to deal with this? My guess would be that the queue mechanism thinks your long running job is timed-out, thus releasing it back into the queue.

This is then picked up by a second worker, which also attempts to process the job. Maybe something else does time out before the job is done. For instance the database connect might be lost. Could you check the logs for any indication of time-outs? Learn more.

Laravel long running queue job picking by second worker Ask Question. Asked 3 months ago. Active 3 months ago. Viewed 82 times. Are you running them as scheduled tasks? You could try the onOneServer method.

laravel queue worker timeout

Not sure if it just works for different servers or also different workers.Check out the full Horizon documentation for more information. Queues allow you to defer the processing of a time consuming task, such as sending an email, until a later time. Deferring these time consuming tasks drastically speeds up web requests to your application.

In this file you will find connection configurations for each of the queue drivers that are included with the framework, which includes a database, BeanstalkdAmazon SQSRedisand a synchronous driver that will execute jobs immediately for local use. A null queue driver is also included which discards queued jobs. Before getting started with Laravel queues, it is important to understand the distinction between "connections" and "queues".

laravel queue worker timeout

However, any given queue connection may have multiple "queues" which may be thought of as different stacks or piles of queued jobs. Note that each connection configuration example in the queue configuration file contains a queue attribute.

Laravel queue timeout issue

This is the default queue that jobs will be dispatched to when they are sent to a given connection. In other words, if you dispatch a job without explicitly defining which queue it should be dispatched to, the job will be placed on the queue that is defined in the queue attribute of the connection configuration:. Some applications may not need to ever push jobs onto multiple queues, instead preferring to have one simple queue.

However, pushing jobs to multiple queues can be especially useful for applications that wish to prioritize or segment how jobs are processed, since the Laravel queue worker allows you to specify which queues it should process by priority. For example, if you push jobs to a high queue, you may run a worker that gives them higher processing priority:.

In order to use the database queue driver, you will need a database table to hold the jobs. To generate a migration that creates this table, run the queue:table Artisan command. Once the migration has been created, you may migrate your database using the migrate command:.

If your Redis queue connection uses a Redis Cluster, your queue names must contain a key hash tag. This is required in order to ensure all of the Redis keys for a given queue are placed into the same hash slot:. You may generate a new queued job using the Artisan CLI:.

laravel queue worker timeout

Job classes are very simple, normally containing only a handle method which is called when the job is processed by the queue. To get started, let's take a look at an example job class. In this example, we'll pretend we manage a podcast publishing service and need to process the uploaded podcast files before they are published:. In this example, note that we were able to pass an Eloquent model directly into the queued job's constructor.

Because of the SerializesModels trait that the job is using, Eloquent models will be gracefully serialized and unserialized when the job is processing. If your queued job accepts an Eloquent model in its constructor, only the identifier for the model will be serialized onto the queue.GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together.

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community. Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account. Then i make Queueable Job to get the same data from model and if there is some data send email. Strange is that, if I call only one simple query in the model, then queue:work What operating system are you using? Windows does not support the things needed for proper timeouts. Is this a verbatim log output?

The time looks weird to me, I'm used to seeing in 24h format. You describe a scenario where you do queue:listen, kill it, and restart it, and see a log output about a failed job afterwards.

There's nothing in the log output that proves that it's the same job that is both started and failed. This could mean that the job that failed at was started at ish, and isn't the same as the one started at You've only given us the log entry that states that a job failed. Are there any other log entries that indicate why a job failed? Perhaps other exceptions reported?

This indicate that there is something in your job that is crashing. It isn't about queue:work vs queue:listen, it is entirely about what your job is doing. Clear out the log files and start over the testing. Give us the entire output of the log files and the source code of the job.

We're currently lacking enough information to debug this and is basically guessing at the moment. So, to be clear, the problem in your last comment isn't about queue:work vs queue:listen, but that there are no logging output for DbVer::first and TorderHuvud::first? It's unclear from the provided code what's happening. I would blame database transactions or something that blocks you from querying the data.

Anyhow, there's nothing obvious about the queue system what I can see. I have never used SQL Anywhere and cannot tell you how to check for locks or transactions interfering with your query. I didn't realize this before but SQL Anywhere is unfortunately not a database type we support. I am facing an exactly same situation. Please also note that i am using this job to sync products from Magento and i am doing this in batches.

I pull products at a time and run another job after 5 secs. But the syncing always fails at random number. Skip to content. Dismiss Join GitHub today GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together.

Sign up. New issue. Jump to bottom. Labels needs more info. Copy link Quote reply. Laravel Version: 5.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. The dark mode beta is finally here. Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I have an issue with the Laravel queue.

It will start processing jobs, but then it hangs somewhere in the middle based on custom echos to the log and ends only with timeout. The problem is that the job should take no more than 1 min, but the job in the queue runs for more than 10 mins without any results nor any errors - except the standard timeout error.

The job that should be processed in the queue is containing standard Eloquent selection and one update method that should update the other model's property. When I call the same method from listener manually in Tinker it takes around 30 sec to complete.

Thus I guess the problem should not be related to the method itself, but something else, possibly configuration? I'm using docker with five containers, two are based on my docker image. The container's start script is based on this tutorial so I can use one container for both - the queue and the app.

The rest of the containers are base on their official docker images - httpd I should also note that I'm using Laravel 5. These values I change in php. Rest should be default. It is set to be a quite generous, because at first I thought the error is related to php config, however is seems not, because there is no error in php's error log. There is the only error, that I'm able to find in laravel. I have tried probably all possible advices that I've found on internet, I have changed all values in the php artisan queue:listen command and also in php.

I have also tried to locate redis log, but without success, thus I moved the queue to the database and the result was always the same. Queue listener started the job, but then somehow hanged without any further information or error. I shuld also say that the worker with all these listeners and jobs works very well outside docker images. I will be very grateful for any advice or tip! Also if you'd like to see more information, please let me know, I'll add them.

In the end I found that the queue worker was really exceeding the timeout. It was due to the fact that during some data migration were removed all foreign keys and indexes, thus loading relations from tables took too long. Redefining relationships in the DB made the queue worker significantly faster and error disappeared. Learn more. Laravel queue job never ends only with timeout when I use queue:listen Ask Question.

Asked 11 months ago. Active 10 months ago. Viewed times. The job The job that should be processed in the queue is containing standard Eloquent selection and one update method that should update the other model's property. My setup I'm using docker with five containers, two are based on my docker image. Silencesys Silencesys 2 2 silver badges 9 9 bronze badges.

The queue container exists when the running job reaches timeout, otherwise it runs without any errors nor information in log.GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together.

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community. Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account.

Hi, I have a task that will take a few minutes to complete. I don't get an error message or something like this. The task just stops working after 60 seconds and keeps marked as running in the dashboard. Maybe this issue is related to I also configured the supervisor to use this redis queue config. With this configuration my long running tasks works. All tasks are will be done within a few milli seconds will be processed using the default queue and therefore the default timeout.

Might I ask how you are scheduling your long running tasks to run on you new redis-long-running connection? Normally you would like your regular "fast" tasks and jobs to run on the default queue which you defined in your redis -connection. Now we have some really long running "slow" jobs which timeouts, for example, a job processing a Podcast. With your solution then we create a new redis-long-running -connection with a longer timeout and a new Horizon superviser for the default queue on that new connection.

For a job to run on the default queue of the redis-long-running -connection, then we use:. I am wondering if it's better to set a specific timeout for the long-running jobs directly on the job? We dispatch an event on a dispatchable class on a specific queue. If the handle method finishes within the defined timeout you shouldn't have any problems.

Your Guide to Laravel Email Queues

While technically enough, yes, you run the risk of masking problems with your jobs that should run quickly. That's why it's good to split them out into your regular queue and your long running queue: long running jobs are given plenty of time to run, and regular jobs still fail if they go beyond the default timeout. Replying to bilfeldt :. If I'm understanding this correctly, as he has it configured, his redis connection handles default queue jobs, and his redis-long-running connection handles long-running-queue queue jobs.The Lumen queue service provides a unified API across a variety of different queue back-ends.

Queues allow you to defer the processing of a time consuming task, such as sending an e-mail, until a later time which drastically speeds up web requests to your application. In order to use the database queue driver, you will need a database table to hold the jobs. To generate a migration that creates this table, run the queue:table Artisan command.

Once the migration is created, you may migrate your database using the migrate command:. Job classes are very simple, normally containing only a handle method which is called when the job is processed by the queue.

To get started, let's take a look at an example job class:. In this example, note that we were able to pass an Eloquent model directly into the queued job's constructor. Because of the SerializesModels trait that the job is using, Eloquent models will be gracefully serialized and unserialized when the job is processing. If your queued job accepts an Eloquent model in its constructor, only the identifier for the model will be serialized onto the queue.

When the job is actually handled, the queue system will automatically re-retrieve the full model instance from the database.

It's all totally transparent to your application and prevents issues that can arise from serializing full Eloquent model instances. The handle method is called when the job is processed by the queue. Note that we are able to type-hint dependencies on the handle method of the job. The Lumen service container automatically injects these dependencies. If an exception is thrown while the job is being processed, it will automatically be released back onto the queue so it may be attempted again.

The job will continue to be released until it has been attempted the maximum number of times allowed by your application. The number of maximum attempts is defined by the --tries switch used on the queue:listen or queue:work Artisan jobs.

More information on running the queue listener can be found below. If you would like to release the job manually, the InteractsWithQueue trait, which is already included in your generated job class, provides access to the queue job release method. The release method accepts one argument: the number of seconds you wish to wait until the job is made available again:.

As noted above, if an exception occurs while the job is being processed, it will automatically be released back onto the queue.

Laravel Tutorial For Beginners Part - 4 - Task Scheduling Using Laravel - PHP Framework - Edureka

You may check the number of attempts that have been made to run the job using the attempts method:. This trait provides several methods allowing you to conveniently push jobs onto the queue, such as the dispatch method:. By pushing jobs to different queues, you may "categorize" your queued jobs, and even prioritize how many workers you assign to various queues. This does not push jobs to different queue "connections" as defined by your queue configuration file, but only to specific queues within a single connection.

To specify the queue, use the onQueue method on the job instance. Sometimes you may wish to delay the execution of a queued job. For instance, you may wish to queue a job that sends a customer a reminder e-mail 15 minutes after sign-up. In this example, we're specifying that the job should be delayed in the queue for 60 seconds before being made available to workers. It is very common to map HTTP request variables into jobs. So, instead of forcing you to do this manually for each request, Lumen provides some helper methods to make it a cinch.

Let's take a look at the dispatchFrom method available on the DispatchesJobs trait. By default, this trait is included on the base Lumen controller class:.

This method will examine the constructor of the given job class and extract variables from the HTTP request or any other ArrayAccess object to fill the needed constructor parameters of the job. So, if our job class accepts a productId variable in its constructor, the job bus will attempt to pull the productId parameter from the HTTP request.

You may also pass an array as the third argument to the dispatchFrom method. This array will be used to fill any constructor parameters that are not available on the request:. Lumen includes an Artisan command that will run new jobs as they are pushed onto the queue.GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together. Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account. So I'm not entirely sure as to what's causing this, but I have run into an issue where a queue job will stall in the queue, then after the defined timeout passes, the job is run, almost as if there is a delay configured, but I don't have one set. And the job is really not doing anything special but I don't think that's a part of the issue due to the symptoms. So the issue is that a job is queued on queue3, horizon can see there is one, and that it's pending, but the job doesn't run until the timeout of is reached for some reason.

In looking at the api request that horizon is making to update the status on screen, the job isn't reserved, or anything UPDATE: Additionally horizon logs never shows an attempt at all which i just noticed this is marked as 2 attempts, so I'm not sure what could cause that as well. At this point I'm stumped, because I can't reproduce on demand, it only happens sometimes and at least right now far and few between, but this will become more critical for this application as it's utilized more than it is now.

I was hoping that perhaps someone else has this issue and greater minds can come to the solution. The job is started and terminated after each deployment, the handle never gets processed. Here is the job and a little background on what it handles. The activity passed in is a spatie activity log model, the other params are either strings or arrays so nothing in there I can see should be an issue.

Additionally, I wrote it so I would know when the job was at least attempted with the activity log update to add in the 'Attempting Import' line. It's also worth noting that this job ran for days without any modifications, and has had so far 2 blips where it didn't get handled no additional activity log on the model or in the horizon logging saying 'Processing' to denote that it even gets attempted at all.

Like I said it shows up in the horizon recent jobs as soon as it's queued A bit of an update here as well, had another very strange occurance: Job was queued at Horizon logs show it started to process but them immediately failed the job:. Is there any sort of issue with running supervisors on multiple machines?

That's the only thing I can think of that could be causing something like this, but I also experienced the same thing during development albeit only once when only a single horizon instance running. Additionally, this time in checking the logs for both horizon instances, I didn't even see the normal "Processing" statement when it would normally start processing, and I have 3 jobs stuck in redis the prefixed job id hashes that are just sitting there.

If this is truly the issue of not being able to run multiple instances even though the UI clearly was built to handle thatthat should be very clearly noted as this is incredibly unexpected. So in further debugging and log tracing, I might have gotten lucky On the latest queue job, queued at there was a log entry at the same time:. This looks to me that the connection timed out during the attempt to mark the job reserved, so it was added to the queue reserved zset, but never updated as being reserved, so it seemingly gets stuck in a blindspot due to this.

I know there is some amount of connection loss handling but it seems this is somewhere it's not being accounted for. Bit swamped myself atm so probably don't have time to deep-dive into this soon. It'll run endlessly for some reason.

I have created a repository for you to simulate the problem easily, its just a clean laravel installation. Problem is - it will never fail that job after the 5 seconds, it just keeps going 'silently?

Would really appreciate if you can take a look into this and run it to see what we are talking about. Cannonb4ll Yeah right, same issue here. We have some job that doing external change by the client. When they don't give response back the job will run some days.